What is your favorite local or folk music?


Philosophy, Politics, Humor, what ever should have its own place far, far away from galleries and feedback... here we can go for it almost shamelessly! :)

Forum rules
More than anywhere on this forum I'd ask you all to be courteous and respectful to each other, but don't hesitate to speak your mind! :geek:
Please, do not advertise commercial software here!
User avatar

Posts: 997

Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:12 am

Post Wed Dec 03, 2014 10:01 am

What is your favorite local or folk music?

Last edited by Lemivision on Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar

Site Admin

Posts: 5870

Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:38 pm

Post Wed Dec 03, 2014 10:06 am

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music

Ahaha, that's so cute! Great idea! It's funny, when you ...sorry, I'm running the first folk song in the background and realize that I understand a few things (?! :o ) "dusa moja" (My angle, soul, or how dusa could be translated...darling?!) I'm amazed how similar it is to Croatian just by being a Slavic language.
Anyway, when you think about digital art, normally only synth music or any instrumental "high brow" stuff comes to mind, but not folk music. But it makes it almost more real in terms of art of humanity, so to say.
Great idea! Even if I have nothing to contribute outside of...well...this. :)
Here to help! :D
http://www.taron.de
System Info: NVidia Gforce GTX 970, 2x 8core Xeon (2.67 Ghz), Windows 7
User avatar

Posts: 997

Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:12 am

Post Wed Dec 03, 2014 12:25 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

Thank you, Taron :) For me it doesn´t matter if the music is pure digital or not, If it has catchy or nice melody or something that I would define like soul inside than I like to hear. And you know, many "digital" or electronic music is influenced by classic or folk tunes and music.
Yes, my angel can be good translation for "Dusa moja" ! :D :ob "Dusa moja" is liitle bit more gentle and poetic.
I was really surprised how could I understand some words from for example Serbian song that my wife found last year on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_Gg6-VFXmc
User avatar

Site Admin

Posts: 5870

Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:38 pm

Post Wed Dec 03, 2014 1:02 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

Yeah, I love linguistics, or at least the snippets I pick up every now and then. I found it interesting that in most Romanic or Germanic languages words may be very similar, but sound very different, but when words in Slavic languages are similar they literally sound the same. Maybe that's just because my native tongue is German, who knows?
When I had a brief look at Sanskrit, I found the only key that connects Slavic languages with Germanic and those I'm familiar with. Before then I thought there was no common root whatsoever, except the occasional spillovers, especially into northern Croatian, or Latin spills into southern Croatia. Obviously that stuff excites me a bit. :)
Here to help! :D
http://www.taron.de
System Info: NVidia Gforce GTX 970, 2x 8core Xeon (2.67 Ghz), Windows 7
User avatar

Posts: 997

Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:12 am

Post Wed Dec 03, 2014 3:16 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

Obviously you are excited with the sort of these things and this is good! It is interesting (and sometimes funny) to hear the pronunciation of the same words in different languages.
I think it is always good do find out more information about the language and our roots. I hated history when I was young but older I am I want to know more about our culture and history and why something was. If you study history you know the future :) History is repeating.. but it is another story.. sorry I run off from the theme.. linguistics is interestig.. I definitely should know more about it!

..Oh, I missed to mention one song from the big czech composer Karel Svoboda. It can illustrate how fine can someone join electronic and classics instruments. It comes from the series "Navstevnici" (Die Besucher, The Visitors)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4PBSzsFxZM

Hmm, I have to stop to mention other good songs. It could be very loooong list.. :)
User avatar

Site Admin

Posts: 5870

Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:38 pm

Post Wed Dec 03, 2014 3:26 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

Well, you started this thread, you might as well post the links! ;) :ob
Here to help! :D
http://www.taron.de
System Info: NVidia Gforce GTX 970, 2x 8core Xeon (2.67 Ghz), Windows 7
User avatar

Posts: 997

Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:12 am

Post Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:11 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

:)
Haha, interesting, there are much more similarities like "dusa moja". It looks in Croatia you use "ahoj", "dobry den" too :)
User avatar

Site Admin

Posts: 5870

Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:38 pm

Post Thu Dec 04, 2014 4:37 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

AH, yeah, here it is "dobar dan". "ahoj", yeah, but most use "bok" here instead, which is really short for "zbogom", which would be "zbohem" for you. Really interesting. But it's clearly the same idea and perfectly understandable.
Another example...in Croatian it's:
dobar - masculine ending (he is good = on je dobar)
dobra - feminine ending (she is good = ona je dobra)
dobro - neutral ending (it is good = to je dobro)
While it seems like in Czech there are no gender specific changes to the ending. I find that peculiar and really pleasant. Danged! :PP ...but as a German it should be nothing too outlandish with the Croatian language. Seems to me Czech is a bit easier than Croatian?!
Here to help! :D
http://www.taron.de
System Info: NVidia Gforce GTX 970, 2x 8core Xeon (2.67 Ghz), Windows 7
User avatar

Posts: 997

Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:12 am

Post Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:05 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

:D I don´t think so :) For foreigners czech language is difficult to learn. We have gender specific endings and moreover diacritics (he is good=on je dobrý, she is good=ona je dobrá,it is good=to je dobré). Also there are difficulties where to use and write vowels y/i or consonants s/z. For example být and bít. The first one is "be" and the second one "to beat somebody". Maybe good example which difficulties could wait for someone who want´s to learn czech language: in english is: I am, you are, he/she is, we are.. in czech: já jsem, ty jsi, on je, my jsme, vy jste, oni jsou. The biggest problem can be for foreigners to pronounce the word "řeřicha" (watercress) because there is no similar equivalent over the world for the czech consonant ´ř´ :).

By the way Croatia is really beautiful country! I was there when I was young (in former Yugoslavia) and for the second time about 8 years ago..

I wonder how many languages do you know (can speak), Taron? :o German, English, Croatian, ...? Are you able to say what is more difficult to study: German or English? I "learned" both but because I am too lazy :oops: I cannot handle well none of them. For me the fist steps were easier with English but than I recognised that there are too many exceptions and phrases..Ufff! In opposite German with its tenses and articles.. das, der, dem, das, die, der, den, die.. :)
User avatar

Site Admin

Posts: 5870

Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:38 pm

Post Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:51 pm

Re: What is your favorite local or folk music?

Oh, my god... English! It's probably one of the easiest languages to learn, really! I suppose spanish might be pretty easy, too, from what I hear and with the bits I have studied Latin I can understand a great deal of all Romanic languages, considering that I haven't learned any.
That's very interesting, by the way, because Google translate is normally not half bad, but when it comes to such endings, it totally drops the ball, hahaha. :roll:
I think, I'd still have a leg up in learning Czech from the little I've learned Croatian already, that's really cool. Here it goes: ja sam, ti si, on je, mi smo, vi ste, oni su. It sounds really like it's actually a little more simple the Czech after all. Hmmm... so Croatian is a really good entry into the Slavic languages then. Who would've known, hehe! :)
Dalmatian dialect makes it actually even eaiser, which is kinda sweet and has a very Italian flair to it.
Well, let me know when you're thinking about coming down to Croatia again! Make sure you stop by Split! My doors are always open for you! :beer:

Oh, as for English... it has a very simple approach to grammar rules compared to our languages, really. As for phrases, it really is a matter of speaking with Brits or Americans for a while and you'll pick up the rest. For me the worst was the loss of standard expressions I was used to in German. You know... funny little things like "Don't paint the devil onto the wall!" and ...holy heck, I forgot my own expressions, haha... but then you pick u...ah "to swat two flies with one hit", which turns out to go "To kill two birds with one stone" in America. I always thought that was way, way, way more brutal, hahaha :twisted: . Nothing I'd like to say. But then they also have almost a literal translation of "Don't look a gift horse in the mouth!", which I thought sounded really awkward. "Ei'm geschenktem Gaul schaut man nicht in's Maul!", that's the German version, which rhymes.
Here to help! :D
http://www.taron.de
System Info: NVidia Gforce GTX 970, 2x 8core Xeon (2.67 Ghz), Windows 7
Next

Return to Off Topic

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by ST Software